When a keto diet can help boost collagen, peptides and other amino acids

A keto-adapted diet can boost the amount of collagen in the body, improve the absorption of amino acids and peptides, and boost the production of collagen-related peptides in the skin, a new study has found.

Key points:The study found that keto diets can boost collagen and peptide production, as well as help to fight acne-causing bacteriaThe researchers believe that ketones might have anti-inflammatory and anti-aging propertiesThe study involved two separate groups of volunteers in their early 20s, who were fed either a standard diet, a ketogenic diet or a control diet, and asked to follow the diet.

The keto group was told to consume 2,500 calories a day and the ketogenic group was fed the standard diet.

The results showed that both groups were able to recover from the initial burnout after six months, with both groups showing a significant increase in their collagen levels.

But the researchers found that both keto groups had a similar recovery period as the controls, meaning the benefits of the keto lifestyle can last up to six months.

The researchers hypothesised that, like the human body, the collagen-producing cells in the liver may be able to repair themselves from prolonged use and are therefore able to absorb more of the peptides they are able to produce.

They also believe that a ketotic diet could be used to treat inflammatory bowel diseases and arthritis, as it could reduce the production and absorption of toxins.

“Our study suggests that dietary ketones, the main energy source for the human liver, might be able both to increase and to reverse the effects of inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis,” said lead researcher Dr Andrew Jones, from the University of Melbourne.

The study, which was published in the journal The Lancet, found that the ketone diet had a significant impact on the production levels of collagen peptides.

The group who were given a ketone-rich diet had significantly higher levels of the collagen peptide hydroxylase, which is used to break down peptides into their simpler forms.

“We found that those who were supplemented with a ketonic diet had higher levels than those who consumed a standard-protein diet,” Dr Jones said.

“The results suggested that it might be possible to reduce the toxic effects of oxidative stress in the human blood and that the production rate of the hydroxyapatite peptides could be increased in the brain and liver.”‘

It’s not that we’re trying to kill all the bacteria’Professor David Wojnarowicz, the senior author of the study, said it was “quite remarkable” that both the ketotic and control groups were recovering after six weeks.

“There’s no doubt that the human immune system, which normally protects against bacteria, can be compromised by the presence of inflammatory cells,” he said.

“This is why we do not recommend a ketosis for people who have inflammatory bowel disorders.”

The keto approach may be especially beneficial for people with arthritis and inflammatory bowel, as a lack of dietary protein is thought to be associated with the development of arthritis and fibromyalgia.

“It’s possible that ketosis might actually be helpful to these people, because it doesn’t require the ingestion of amino acid derivatives and is not metabolised in the same way as protein does,” Dr Wojnikowski said.

The research was supported by the Australian Research Council, and the Australian Medical Research Council.

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